Tag Archives: Interactive art

Playing with light by Utterback

Human movement on camera in a public space creates the visual input, followed by writing software that creates the visual output. This is basically the process that Camille Utterback uses to then integrate forms, created by ink and pencil drawings, with human movement. These forms appear and disappear on a screen based on the movements made by an audience. Once this happens an almost circular process of movement, forms and again movement is created. To keep this process going the audience has to embrace vulnerability in order to visualize the movement on the screen, trying to maintain control. All of this is supported by technology what leads to the question where we can put the matter of control.

(WIRED. (2009, October 20), Interactive art: Playing with light [YouTube]. Via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-lOAoWcAV8)

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Man made earthquakes in Eindhoven

How do people respond to the infringement of nature caused by man itself? This question is the drive behind the artworks of Danish artist Sissel Marie Tonn. For Tonn the Netherlands is especially interesting for investigating this question because of its history of overlap between culture and nature. This history resonates in the saying “God created the earth but the Dutch created the Netherlands”. At the Van Abbemuseum Tonn created an interactive artwork of an intimate archive of all the man made earthquakes in Groningen. Tonn’s goal is to transfer the experience of an earthquake rather than to provide information about it. This experience should not only encourage people to become curious but also inspire them to come up with a better solution for the problem. Last Saturday I experienced for the first time how an earthquake feels. The 12 sensations of the installation felt eerie and waiting for the next shock was nerve wrecking even within the save environment of ‘Het oog’ in the Van Abbemuseum. I asked Tonn whether the NAM had visited her artwork but they told her they weren’t interested.


Karin van den Driesche